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Vol 5  

Issue 
7  September 2017

FROM JACOB HACKER

Congress hasn’t proved very productive lately—especially on health care. But our health care team is producing plenty of important work. Alan Gerber, the director of our Center for the Study of American Politics, has a new co-authored book that helps explain why "evidence-based medicine” is so elusive in our fragmented and costly health system. Two other important publications: Kelly Rader's timely coauthored article on how racial resentment drives opposition to federal spending; and Alan Gerber, Greg Huber, and Al Fang’s new article on how voter concerns about ballot secrecy affect their political behavior. Finally, a new ISPS paper shows how pork-barrel politics affects Medicare costs. It is written by a veritable A-Team of ISPS professors and graduate students, including Zack Cooper, director of ISPS Health; ISPS Fellow Amanda Kowalski; and Jen Wu, a graduate student in political science who came to us from work with Zack and Amanda here at ISPS. It’s these kinds of collaborate products that make ISPS distinctive. We could use more of them in Congress.

 

UPCOMING EVENTS IN OCTOBER

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES WORKSHOPS
Oct 3 @ 12:00 Philipp Strack (Berkeley) "Unrealistic Expectations and Misguided Learning"
Oct 17 @ 12:00 Daniel Salzman (Columbia) “Neural Mechanisms for Representing and Updating Cognitive, Social, and Motivational Information in the Brain.”

CSAP WORKSHOPS
Oct 4  @ 12:00   John Dearborn (Yale) "The Foundations of the Modern Presidency"
Oct 11  @ 12:00  Tom Clark (Emory) "Police Shooting & Trust in Government"
Oct 25  @ 12:00  Patrick O’Brien (Yale) "Presidential Control and Public Finance"

RESEARCH DATA SUPPORT TRAINING
See Calendar of Events

ISPS COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH ON CONGRESS AND MEDICARE




A new ISPS collaborative research study by Zack Cooper, Amanda Kowalski, Eleanor Powell and Jennifer Wu looks at the revolving door of health care politics. The NBER Working Paper, “Politics, Hospital Behavior, and Healthcare Spending” follows an obscure rule, Section 508, and how it affects Medicare waiver payments to hospitals, resulting in more staff hires (with no changes in the mortality rate), large CEO pay hikes (up to 81%), and an increase in campaign contributions from healthcare industry (up to 65%). Related stories in Economist and Politico.

NEW BOOK ON THE POLITICS OF EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE




Authors Alan Gerber, Eric Patashnik and Conor Dowling recently published their book, "Unhealthy Politics:The Battle over Evidence-Based Medicine" (Princeton University Press). The book shows how the government's efforts to promote evidence-based medicine is mired in political division, resulting in higher medical costs, and patients receiving either too little or too much treatment. The authors offer solutions that can lead to better care with sound evidence-based treatments for the populace. Hear the WBUR interview. 

POLICY LAB HOSTING FILM EVENT ON #BLACKLIVESMATTER




On Monday October 30th, the Policy Lab will be hosting a screening
of the film “Questions of Justice: Officers of Color in the Era of #BlackLivesMatter” by Yale students Aaron Peirano Garrison and Clark Burnett. The film explores the complicated experience of minority police officers in an era of tension between police and minority communities. The film will be followed by a panel discussion featuring an esteemed group of student activists, police officers, and professors. The screening will begin at 6:00 PM and will take place in Luce Hall 101.

ISPS RECEIVES SUPPORT FROM LIBRARY INSTITUTE




A project to extend the work of the CURE consortium has been awarded a grant by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The project, led by The Odum Institute at UNC Chapel Hill, will develop a training program for librarians and archivists focused on data curation for reproducibility. The Odum Institute Data Archive employs a process similar to that of the ISPS Data Archive, providing data curation and code review services to journals such as the American Journal of Political Science (AJPS) and State Politics and Policy Quarterly (SPPQ).

PEER REVIEWED ARTICLES

"The Effect on Turnout of Campaign Mobilization Messages Addressing Ballot Secrecy Concerns: A Replication Experiment," published by Alan S. Gerber, Gregory A. Huber, Albert H. Fang, and Catlan E. Reardon in PLOS ONE.
"The Federal Spending Paradox: Economic Self-Interest and Symbolic Racism in Contemporary Fiscal Politics," published by Kelly Rader (and Katherine Krimmel) in American Politics Research. Related article: Harvard Business Review

QUOTE US

“It almost looked like a light switch was being flipped on.” Zack Cooper in "The Company Behind Many Surprise Emergency Room Bills." New York Times  Related paper: NBER
"We know that Medicare Advantage plans already operate in counties where there are no private insurers.” Jacob Hacker in "Here's How Expanding Medicare Could Set Us on the Path to Universal Health Coverage." Los Angeles Times